What makes older people more likely to fall?

What makes older people more likely to fall?

Seniors across Maryland and the rest of the United States are highly susceptible to slip-and-fall accidents and associated injuries, and there are numerous factors that make you, as an older individual, more likely to take a tumble. AgingCare.com reports that falls are the single-largest cause of injury, hospital stays, and death among older populations, so it is critical that you learn what risk factors you may have to enhance your chances of avoiding a serious fall.

Part of the falling problem can be tied to environmental hazards, such as loose wiring, loose carpeting, a lack of proper handrails and so on. While these types of hazards pose a threat to you regardless of age, there are additional factors at work among older populations that can make you, as a senior, more likely to be affected by them.

For example, many seniors experience vision problems as they age. If you are among them, this can make you more prone to falling, and this is particularly true if you fail to wear glasses or contacts as prescribed. As you age, you also tend to decrease your general level of physical activity, and this can lead to diminished mobility, bone loss, and weakened muscles. You may also be more likely to fall as a senior if you suffer from certain medical conditions that can affect balance and stability, such as arthritis.

If you are a senior who takes certain prescription medications, this, too, can increase your chances of suffering a slip-and-fall accident. Antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants, and some sedatives all have the capacity to affect balance, and some medications, when combined with one another, can increase your chances of falling even further.

This information about why seniors are more likely to slip and fall is meant to educate you, but it is not intended to be taken as legal advice.